A farmers' market at a federally qualified health center improves fruit and vegetable intake among low-income diabetics

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dc.contributor.authorDarcy A.Freedman
dc.contributor.authorSeul Ki Choi
dc.contributor.authorThomas Hurley
dc.contributor.authorEdith Anadu
dc.contributor.authorJames R.Hébert
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-31T08:22:10Z
dc.date.available2019-07-31T08:22:10Z
dc.date.issued2013-05-01
dc.identifier.issn0091-7435
dc.identifier.urihttp://repository.kihasa.re.kr/handle/201002/32959
dc.description.abstractObjective A 22-week federally qualified health center (FQHC)-based farmers' market (FM) and personal financial incentive intervention designed to improve access to and consumption of fruits and vegetables (FVs) among low-income diabetics in rural South Carolina was evaluated. Methods A mixed methods, one-group, repeated-measures design was used. Data were collected in 2011 before (May/June), during (August), and after (November) the intervention with 41 diabetes patients from the FQHC. FV consumption was assessed using a validated National Cancer Institute FV screener modified to include FV sold at the FM. Sales receipts were recorded for all FM transactions. A mixed-model, repeated measures analysis of variance was used to assess intervention effects on FV consumption. Predictors of changes in FV consumption were examined using logistic regression. Results A marginally significant (p = 0.07) average increase of 1.6 servings of total FV consumption per day occurred. The odds of achieving significant improvements in FV consumption increased for diabetics using financial incentives for payment at the FM (OR: 38.8, 95% CI: 3.4–449.6) and for those frequenting the FM more often (OR: 2.1, 95% CI: 1.1–4.0). Conclusions Results reveal a dose–response relationship between the intervention and FV improvements and emphasize the importance of addressing economic barriers to food access.
dc.format.extent5
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.titleA farmers' market at a federally qualified health center improves fruit and vegetable intake among low-income diabetics
dc.typeArticle
dc.type.localArticle(Academic)
dc.subject.keywordPrevention & control
dc.subject.keywordCommunity health centers
dc.subject.keywordHealth promotion
dc.subject.keywordDiabetes mellitus, type 2
dc.subject.keywordObesity
dc.subject.keywordPoverty
dc.contributor.affiliatedAuthorSeul Ki Choi
dc.identifier.localIdKIHASA-2811
dc.citation.titlePreventive Medicine
dc.citation.volume56
dc.citation.number5
dc.citation.date2013
dc.citation.startPage288
dc.citation.endPage292
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationPreventive Medicine, vol. 56, no. 5, pp. 288 - 292
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